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"Tim Spring heads the ‘assiduous’ team at Moore Blatch LLP."

Legal 500 2016

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Type 2 diabetes

Diabetes affects over three million people in the UK and type 2 is by far the more common.

  • Type 2 - the body cannot produce enough insulin or the body is unable to respond to it appropriately, effectively becoming resistant to it.

This is a problem because the body requires insulin to convert the glucose we eat into energy which in turn controls the glucose levels in our blood stream. The stomach breaks down the food we eat into glucose, glucose then enters the bloodstream and stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin.

The insulin acts as a key to the cells to enable the glucose to be used or stored. When the insulin fails for whatever reason, the glucose remains in the blood stream and can become dangerously high.

It is very important that diagnosis is made as early as possible as left untreated, the condition will get progressively worse.

Who is at risk?

Risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes include:

  • Being overweight or obese

  • Increasing age (NICE guidelines state being age 40 plus (or older than 25 years for some minority ethnic groups) is an important risk factor)

  • Lack of physical activity

  • Unhealthy diet

- See more at: https://www.mooreblatch.com/individual/clinical-negligence/diabetes/#sthash.QW6bTNGO.dpuf
  • Type 2 - the body cannot produce enough insulin or the body is unable to respond to it appropriately, effectively becoming resistant to it.

This is a problem because the body requires insulin to convert the glucose we eat into energy which in turn controls the glucose levels in our blood stream. The stomach breaks down the food we eat into glucose, glucose then enters the bloodstream and stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin.

The insulin acts as a key to the cells to enable the glucose to be used or stored. When the insulin fails for whatever reason, the glucose remains in the blood stream and can become dangerously high.

It is very important that diagnosis is made as early as possible as left untreated, the condition will get progressively worse.

Who is at risk?

Risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes include:

  • Being overweight or obese

  • Increasing age (NICE guidelines state being age 40 plus (or older than 25 years for some minority ethnic groups) is an important risk factor)

  • Lack of physical activity

  • Unhealthy diet

- See more at: https://www.mooreblatch.com/individual/clinical-negligence/diabetes/#sthash.QW6bTNGO.dpuf

Type 2 diabetes is where the body cannot produce enough insulin or the body is unable to respond to it appropriately, effectively becoming resistant to it.

This is a problem because the body requires insulin to convert the glucose we eat into energy which in turn controls the glucose levels in our blood stream. The stomach breaks down the food we eat into glucose, glucose then enters the bloodstream and stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin.

The insulin acts as a key to the cells to enable the glucose to be used or stored. When the insulin fails for whatever reason, the glucose remains in the blood stream and can become dangerously high.

It is very important that diagnosis is made as early as possible as left untreated, the condition will get progressively worse.

Who is at risk?

Risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes include:

  • Being overweight or obese

  • Increasing age (NICE guidelines state being age 40 plus (or older than 25 years for some minority ethnic groups) is an important risk factor)

  • Lack of physical activity

  • Unhealthy diet

According to figures published by Public Health England, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2 diabetes; and 90% of adults with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese.

It is also estimated that there are around 600,000 more undiagnosed diabetics and this trend is set to increase markedly over the next few decades as a result of increasing obesity.

Type 2 diabetes is usually late onset but is said to increasingly affect children. Type 2 can usually be managed by controlling weight, keeping active and/or with use of tablets.

Contact us

If you or a loved one has suffered unnecessary death or disability as a result of poor diabetes care, we would be happy to discuss the treatment and care you have received and advise you as to whether you may have a claim for compensation.

Our specialist clinical negligence team includes lawyers qualified in medicine and nursing with practical skills of working in hospital and other care environments.

We can help you fund your medical negligence claim and will agree a method of funding that does not expose you to any financial risk or worry.

To make a free, no obligation enquiry about diabetes negligence, please contact Denise Deakin.

Contact us

If you or a loved one has suffered unnecessary death or disability as a result of poor diabetes care, we would be happy to discuss the treatment and care you have received and advise you as to whether you may have a claim for compensation.

Our specialist clinical negligence team includes lawyers qualified in medicine and nursing with practical skills of working in hospital and other care environments.

We can help you fund your medical negligence claim and will agree a method of funding that does not expose you to any financial risk or worry.

To make a free, no obligation enquiry about diabetes negligence, please contact Denise Deakin.

- See more at: https://www.mooreblatch.com/individual/clinical-negligence/diabetes/#sthash.8Sj6bg5x.dpuf

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